Zoom Logo

famine summer school - Shared screen with speaker view - Recording 1/2
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
43:38
Well done, Paula!!!
Bert Barry
43:48
I think an exhibit in one of the Workhouses would be moving.
Austin Comerton
44:10
Excellent presentation
Grandma
44:20
wonderful presentation Derek (Grandma)
Tom Green
44:21
How hard is it transporting so many glass potatos
Averil Staunton
44:22
Very creative exhibition and I look forward to seeing it at the Museum of County Life in Castlebar
Marguerite Corporaal
44:23
I like the focus on the potato which make the monument also transnational, for the potato blight badly affected Scotland and Flanders/the Netherlands.
Austin Comerton
44:39
Workhouse in Portumna ideal
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
45:13
Great question, Tom. I was wondering the same.
Billy Byrne
45:23
Jason Can you mute all except speakeras I am hearing a person on the phone
Padraig Kirwan
45:48
That was an amazing introduction to the work, Paula. Thanks a million!
Maire Leddy
45:51
Fantastic presentation Paula! I hope to see it on it’s journey☘️
Pamela Salmon
46:00
So proud, wonderful work Paula, well done
Billy Byrne
46:22
How do we contact paula
Paula Stokes
46:45
paula_stokes@hotmail.com
Paula Stokes
47:06
www.1845mementomori.com
Rose Morris
48:10
Well done Paula. Wonderful presentation. Very moving. Looking forward to seeing it in Tyrone. a big thanks to you and all concerned in today’s event. Great to have this kind of experience.
6CGvDdMicheal Marrinan
01:01:01
Speaking far too fast Padraig.
Mike Murphy
01:21:27
Chella
Mike Murphy
01:22:04
Was it only the Choctaws?
Pauline Lomax
01:22:39
I was interested in why the perception was different between Highlanders and the Irish b
6CGvDdMicheal Marrinan
01:23:59
thanks Chellle,Padraig,Christine. 3 way conversation was a Splended method of communicating your expertise/knowledge.
Catherine Shannon
01:24:49
Wonderful discussion. As to Michelle's comment about Scotch Irish wanting to develop a separate identity from the Catholic Irish, there is one exception to this in the Charitable Irish Society of Boston's history. Founded by Presbyteriam Ulster men in 1737, they later welcomed Catholics who came in increasing numbers in the first decades of the 1800s. They saw a common identity as Irishmen and not only cooperated together in the American Revolution, but also in providing relief together in the 1840s.
Bert Barry
01:25:11
For anyone visiting County Cork, visit the Choctaw memorial in Midleton. It is beautiful.
Jan Carr
01:28:36
Will this be available afterward in replay? I missed the beginning (time difference in NYC)\
Mike Murphy
01:28:43
Very good
Rose Morris
01:29:57
Thanks Chellle,Padraig,Christine. That was a wonderful discussion.
Billy Byrne
01:30:05
Thank you all very interesting
Jan Carr
01:30:14
Thank you to all.
Marguerite Corporaal
02:18:38
Fantastic paper, Mark (as always)!
Pauline Lomax
02:20:25
fascinating.
Bert Barry
02:20:35
Great information Mark. Thank you.
Pauline Lomax
02:20:54
how many more agents were like him. He sounds like a control freak.
Padraig Kirwan
02:20:54
Sincere thanks, Mark. Wonderful!
Martin Fagan
02:21:16
Thank you Mark for this wonderful nuanced account of the emigration scheme. I was particularly interested in the difference of opinion you have discovered between the Major and John Ross in the NLI letters. It seems that JRM's view prevailed - it would be interesting to match the Major's decisions with the ongoing potato failures and famine between 1846 and 1847- ie what was happening in March 1847 to convince him to go with JRM's plan
Jackie Crowley
02:21:18
Wonderful paper Mark. Tough act to follow
Lynn Alex
02:22:55
Insightful, nuanced perspectives. Thank you. How can someone determine whether one can identify whether known late 1840s emigrants (Gannons and Hanlys) from Strokestown area were part of Mahon tenants?
Billy Byrne2021
02:23:38
Thanks Mark. Again the more we look the more we find. It is not all black and white as we were led to believe.
Pauline Lomax
02:24:31
assume that the wall was part of the public works?
Caroilin Callery
02:27:38
Lynn there were definitely a number of Hanly Families in our Missing 1,490. Mark has a database and a number of criteria he applies to work out if Families are a match. Can you forward any details you have please.
mark mcgowan
02:51:23
In response to Lynn: There are the "widow Gannon from Cregga Plunkett Quarter, John Gannon from Ballyhubert, Edward Hanly and Phelim Hamlyfrom Cregga House Division, Thomas Hanly from Goortoose Holmes, Thady Hanly from Kilgraffy, and Pat Hanly from Tooreen,
6CGvDdMicheal Marrinan
02:52:26
Go raibh agaibh go léir. Looking forward to hearing a rebroadcast.
Jackie Crowley
03:06:19
In response to Pauline: As I mentioned the research is still ongoing but, to date, the evidence suggests that the Famine wall was a private undertaking in its initial phases. There is evidence that the wall was started in the early 1840s before the outbreak of the Famine and that additional workers were added for relief. It certainly may have formed part of a public works scheme as the crisis continued but before 1846, to the best of our knowledge, it was a private relief scheme.
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
03:10:10
So is this similar to the runrig system seen in the Highlands?
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
03:16:52
Okay, wado- thank you.
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
03:17:21
I enjoyed these a lot. Very helpful seeing these different people.
Pauline Lomax
03:17:41
Misynderstood
Catherine Shannon
03:17:43
Three fantastic presentations.
Lynn Alex
03:18:02
Thank you for all--nuanced, to say the least! I appreciate the opportunity to access these presentations at 1000s of miles distant!
Catherine Shannon
03:30:17
It is a n Irish day here in New England, cold, rainy and windy.
Marguerite Corporaal
03:34:53
When will the 4th Famine walk be held?
Jan Carr
03:49:13
Is the Education Pack available to those of us in the U.S. who can’t travel to walk the trail? How might we get it?
Jason King
03:49:59
The Education Pack will be free and downloadable, but is not available yet.
Jan Carr
03:50:19
Thank you.
Sophia Isajiw
03:51:05
How long did it take you to develop all of these materials?
Amy Day
03:53:16
That video is available in its entirety on the app?
Lynn Alex
03:53:51
How many of the families do you have sufficient information about to create the shoe stories?
mark mcgowan
03:55:02
Lynn: About 161, but details for about 50.
Lynn Alex
03:55:44
Thanks.
Caroilin Callery
03:56:30
If you email me at caroilincallery@yahoo.com I will forward you a copy of the Education Pack Jan or anyone else who would like it.
Sophia Isajiw
03:56:46
Thank you!
Jan Carr
03:56:57
Thank you, Carolin. I will email. Many thanks.
Lindsay Janssen
03:56:59
That's great - would love to see it, Caroilyn!
Lynn Alex
03:57:00
Fantastic. Thank you.
Caroilin Callery
03:57:33
Note there is no e at the end of my first name in the email - common error people do……
Caroilin Callery
03:58:37
The Shoe Story Video in it’s entirety is available on the National Famine Way Website under the Shoe Story tab.
Jason King
03:59:37
The Shoe Story video url: https://youtu.be/XCir6Smn194
Caroilin Callery
03:59:49
Sophie - intense work throughout the pandemic - very full on. It would have taken double the time without lockdown !
Sophia Isajiw
04:00:33
So the bronze shoe sculptures, the guide, the audio app, all of this was done in a year and a bit? How big was the team?
Averil Staunton
04:02:07
Is that book available to read Marit?
Caroilin Callery
04:03:11
Marguerite - the Trail can be done at anytime but I am planning on doing it the last two weeks in June.
Billy Byrne2021
04:03:37
Fantastic work to all involved in this great project since the first walk.
Jason King
04:04:25
Daniel's story by Marita Conlon-McKenna can be read in instalments (one per link) here: https://nationalfamineway.ie/shoe-stories/
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer
04:04:51
I hope y'all don't mind me putting this here for US viewers. This is the author page for Marita:https://www.amazon.com/Marita-Conlon-McKenna/e/B001ITXMIE/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1
Lynn Alex
04:06:11
Marita--did you try to capture mid-19th century language in Daniel's story? Would he likely have spoken Irish?
Billy Byrne2021
04:07:49
Maeita said she is not a walker but did a walk from the Rathdown Union Workhouse to Killiney Hill back in 1992
Amy Day
04:07:54
I posed that question to Ciaran Reilly in connection with the musical I'm writing about the Strokestown story. His perspective after reviewing thousands of Strokestown petitions was that Irish was not spoken on the estate at the time.
cathalpoirteir
04:11:03
The fact that the petitions were written in English does not mean that the people did not speak Irish. In many places people would have been illiterate in Irish but it may well have been their daily languagw
Averil Staunton
04:13:47
Do you stay overnight in different villages?
Billy Byrne2021
04:16:08
I still look after that graveyard
Amy Day
04:17:30
Thank you for this informative presentation!
Averil Staunton
04:17:31
Thanks so much and congratulations of the amazing amount of work you have done.